Columbia River research

Action Effectiveness Monitoring for the Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Restoration Program Annual Report for Year 15 (October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2019)

This report describes Action Effectiveness Monitoring program accomplishments during October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2019, or Year 15 of this on-going project. For more information on this project since its inception in 2007, please see previous years' annual reports.

Action Effectiveness Monitoring for the Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Restoration Program Annual Report for Year 14 (October 1, 2017 to September 30, 2018)

This report describes Action Effectiveness Monitoring program accomplishments during October 1, 2017 to September 30, 2018, or Year 14 of this on-going project. For more information on this project since its inception in 2007, please see previous years' annual reports.

Action Effectiveness Monitoring for the Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Restoration Program Annual Report for Year 13 (October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017)

This report describes Action Effectiveness Monitoring program accomplishments during October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017, or Year 13 of this on-going project. For more information on this project since its inception in 2007, please see previous years' annual reports.

The effects of run-of-river dam spill on Columbia River microplankton

Abstract   Dams, increasingly common in riverine systems worldwide, are particularly prevalent on the Columbia River (CR) in the United States. Hydroelectric projects, including both storage and run‐of‐river (i.e., minimal storage) structures, on the mainstem CR highly manage water flow, often by releasing water over (rather than through) dams as “spill.” To test the effects of run‐of‐river dam spill on microplankton abundance

Biotic vs. abiotic forcing on plankton assemblages varies with season and size class in a large temperate estuary

Abstract   Large river estuaries experience multiple anthropogenic stressors. Understanding plankton community dynamics in these estuaries provides insights into the patterns of natural variability and effects of human activity. We undertook a 2-year study in the Columbia River Estuary to assess the potential impacts of abiotic and biotic factors on planktonic community structure over multiple time scales.

Engaging High School Students as Collaborators in Ecological Investigation of the Columbia River Estuary: Lessons from a Transdisciplinary University–High School Partnership

Abstract   The Columbia River Estuary Science Education and Outreach (CRESCENDO) project was a university–high school partnership between Washington State University (WSU) researchers and science teachers and students from five high schools located in southwest Washington, adjacent to the Columbia River Estuary (CRE).