About Us

We live for the Columbia River

The Estuary Partnership was founded in 1995, and 2020 is our 25th year of protecting and advocating for the lower Columbia River. 

We restore habitat for keystone species like salmon and steelhead. We monitor ecosystem conditions and share our scientific findings. We seek methods to mitigate for changing climate conditions.

We educate the upcoming generation about outdoor science and offer opportunities for community members to make a difference in their watershed. And we work in partnership with hundreds of organizations, companies, agencies, and individuals, because together our impact is so much greater.

More about us

  • Our Area

    The Estuary Partnership focuses on the lower 146 miles of the Columbia River. This tidally-influenced area stretches from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean and includes 28 cities and portions of nine counties.

  • Land Acknowledgement

    The lower Columbia River (Wimahl in Upper Chinook and Nch’i-Wàna in Sahaptin) has been inhabited and stewarded by numerous tribes and bands of Indigenous peoples since time immemorial, and these peoples continue to have a deep and abiding connection to our lands and waters. The broad geography of the lower Columbia historically included dozens of seasonal and permanent villages and an interconnected web of tribal affiliations. Tribes including the Chinook, Clatsop, Kathlamet, Wahkiakum, Multnomah, Cascades, Tualatin Kalapuya, Molalla, Wasco, Clackamas, Cowlitz, Skilloot, and Atfalati have ancestral connections to the lower Columbia and continue to be stewards of the river. We recognize that tribal territories were often shared and overlapping, and that this may be an incomplete list of those who lived on these lands. We pay respect to the elders, both past and present, who have stewarded the waters and lands of the Columbia River throughout generations. Read more.

  • Our Mission

    To restore and care for the waters and ecosystems of the Lower Columbia River, for current and future generations of fish, wildlife, and people.

  • National Estuary Program

    The National Estuary Program ensures our critical coastal waterways are healthy and support the communities around them. National Estuary Programs are local people working together to restore the water quality and ecological integrity of the 28 estuaries of national significance across the United States, including the lower Columbia River. 

    Created by Congress in 1987, the National Estuary Program provides seed money to local communities, who leverage those resources to improve habitat, find solutions to difficult ecological issues, support our coastal economies, and engage community members to care for their waterways.

     

Water Trails

Discover your local waterways by nonmotorized boat!


FEATURED PARTNER

Wolf Water Resources

Wolf Water Resources, a local watershed science and engineering firm, has partnered with the Estuary Partnership over the last few years to guide the Steigerwald Reconnection Project through its design, permitting, and construction phases. With the Steigerwald floodplain and Gibbons Creek now reconnected to the Columbia River for the first time in many decades, the dedicated staff at Wolf Water Resources are grateful for their role in bringing so many benefits to the fish, wildlife, and non-wild residents, neighbors, and managers of the Refuge. Wolf Water Resources also wishes to recognize the valuable contributions of their design partners: Cornforth Consultants, KPFF Consulting Engineers, Herbon Landscape Architecture, West Consultants, Murraysmith, and Statewide Land Surveying.