News and Events

Sep 28, 2019 - 10:00am
Join the Estuary Partnership, nonprofit Depave, Portland Public Schools, and the Sitton School PTA and community as we rip out a big swath of asphalt to improve their schoolyard. North Portland's Sitton Elementary School has a lot of outside space, but they don’t have a good place to teach their students about native plants, stormwater, and how it affects the nearby Willamette River. The project will remove approximately 3,000 square feet of asphalt and replace it with trees and native plants that infiltrate and filter stormwater, provide shade, and increase students’ access to and understanding of urban nature and green infrastructure. Sitton students will plant the native trees and shrubs later in the fall.  
Changes in climate are shifting our approach to conservation.In 2016, we adopted voluntary targets for recovery of native habitat to meet an overall goal of historical habitat diversity and protection of biodiversity. These targets are aggressive, but they address recovering historical habitat. Yet we know now that climate change is fundamentally altering ecosystem processes and species ranges. We know we must adapt our methods.
"It's really fun actually. I like cutting [Scotch broom] because I know I'm helping the environment."Recently, KGW News joined us in Astoria, Oregon for a Lewis and Clark Elementary School field trip to Coffenbury Lake in Ft. Stevens State Park. Students pulled Scotch broom and paddled on the lake in our Big Canoes. Watch the students in action! 
Great news!The Columbia River Basin Restoration Act - which will bring millions of dollars to the region to improve water quality throughout the Columbia River Basin - was signed into law December 16 as part of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act. The Act authorizes a grant program administered by the U.S. EPA to help local groups voluntarily clean up, monitor, and reduce the use of toxics within the Columbia River Basin. “The Estuary Partnership has worked on passage of this Act for eight years, and we are thrilled that the bill is finally law.
The Estuary Partnership is undertaking the first, large-scale effort to identify and map marine debris in the lower Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. We're tracking small to medium size marine debris (less than 35-feet) - things like tires, styrofoam blocks, small boats, machinery, and other material that may harm the river. We'll use this information to understand how big the problem is, and make a plan for how to clean it up.
Dave Ripp, 2016 Steward of the Year
The Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership is proud to announce our 2016 Steward of the Year: Dave Ripp, Executive Director of the Port of Camas-Washougal and long-time advocate for the Columbia River. The Port’s mission is to bring jobs, infrastructure, and recreational opportunities to East Clark County. Dave excels in all three areas. Under his leadership, the Port continues to expand; attracting 47 tenants in a variety of businesses to the 430-acre industrial park and adjacent 120 acre Steigerwald Commerce Center.
Great news!The Columbia River Basin Restoration Act - which will bring millions of dollars to the region to improve the river's water quality - is one step closer to becoming reality. Thursday, September 15, 2016, the U.S. Senate passed the Act as part of the Water Resources Development Act of 2016. The WRDA addresses critical fish and wildlife habitat, water quality, and infrastructure needs in 18 states. If the Act becomes law, it will authorize a grant program administered by the U.S.
With funding from REI, and in partnership with the City of Ridgefield, the Port of Ridgefield, McCuddy’s Ridgefield Marina, Alder Creek, and others, the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership is spearheading a non-motorized boating improvement project at the Ridgefield Boat Ramp. Take the Survey!
Since our restoration project at La Center Bottoms was completed last fall, we’ve been monitoring the site to assess the ecological impacts of our restoration. We placed a time-lapse camera to capture some of the winter storms and the resulting high water.

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